From Greenlight to Greenlit

TLDR: Drawn In was Greenlit!

More complicated version: Drawn In was Greenlit just as Greenlight breathed it's dying breath. However, it seems that literally thousands of pending games were also Greenlit. This leaves me with mixed feelings. Ultimately I'm happy that I can release Drawn In on Steam, but it does sort of feel like I didn't really achieve it myself. At the time of Greenlight's shutdown Drawn In was sitting around 32% yes votes. I've heard of games getting Greenlit with less. Also not all the pending Greenlight games were actually Greenlit upon shutdown, so there is some merit there.

Back in February when it was announced that Greenlight would be shutdown, I decided to focus on finishing Drawn In and to get it through before the then nebulous deadline of "sometime in Spring". This website exists primarily to promote my games, specifically Drawn In for now and to help build awareness and generate legitimate votes to get through the process. I had (naively) assumed that when Greenlight would finally stop accepting submissions, they would continue to allow voting on the remaining games, so it came as a shock to see it shutdown in such an abrupt fashion. InĀ Jim Sterling's video about the end of Greenlight he surmises that Valve batch approved games, because they didn't want to refund all the users Greenlight fees. I'm inclined to agree. Given the level of crap that was accepted however, I kind of wish I'd put a bunch of my Jam Games that I may flesh out in the future. No matter, the replacement for Greenlight, Steam Direct has a fee of $100 per game which I think is fair (and before I used Greenlight, I thought the fee was per game anyway).

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